Project A “Observational documentary”

Individual Proposal 

“A Dance With Humanity” is about many aspects of humanity in modern city life and how people of different cultures have adapted to it, showing both day and night life throughout many locations within the diverse city of London.

The form I will be incorporating is rhetorical form as I wish to imply that despite all our differences we are all inherently the same. Through only observational methods I will make the camera act as an unbiased viewer on the diverse Londoners going about their daily lives. The technical rules I’ve intended to use are fixed camera only, individual clips in the editing should be no longer than ten seconds and a range of wide, medium and close-up shots. I’ve chosen these because I feel they are best suited for the style of film I wish to make. A fixed camera allows me to capture people’s daily lives without being over intrusive, I intend to time-lapse these scenes. Having clips no longer than ten seconds long allows me to capture a wide variety of locations within London and a range of wide, medium and close-up shots challenges me to capture life uninterrupted in a variety of ways.

“A Dance With Humanity” is an observational documentary showing many aspects of humanity in modern city life and how people have adapted to it, showing both day and night life throughout London. How different ethnicities, religions, cultures, sexualities and genders all live and interact with each other within the city. The film will also portray the very things that make us human such as music and art and how these have been integrated within the fabric of London life.

I’ve chosen to do a film about this subject because diversity and individuality is something that I believe should be celebrated but I also want to show that no matter how ideologically different or aesthetically different we are all still the same, we are all human and coexisting.

Research from David Bordwell & Kristin Thompson Film Art: An Introduction Chapter 5 The Shot: Cinematics I looked into changing tonality after filming and how Avant-garde directors used tinting to create a desired mood or feel to a scene. I also look at Chapter 10 Documentary, Experimental, and Animated Films from this I explored Rhetorical and Categorical form and which best fitted the type of documentary I wished to make.
I also did research into observational documentaries which are Koyaanisqatsi, Which I chose due to it’s interesting portrayal of humanity and their relationship with technology and nature. Godfrey Reggio achieved this with his artistic choice of shots. The other film I chose was Pink Floyd: Live in Pompeii, this film uses a great range of shots and clever editing to show the history of Pompeii which contrasts with the band’s music.

Bibliography:

Bordwell, D. and Thompson, K. (2001). Film Art: An Introduction 10th ed. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, pp.163-165, 355-369.

Filmography:

Koyaanisqatsi. (1982). Directed by Godfrey Reggio [Film] USA: IRE Productions, Santa Fe Institute for Regional Education

Pink Floyd: Live in Pompeii. (1972). Directed by Adrian Maben [Film] France: Universal Studios

 

Synopsis 

“A Dance with Humanity” is an observational documentary about a range of aspects of humanity within modern city life and how people have adapted to it. The film will show both day and night life throughout London and how different ethnicities, religions, cultures, sexualities and genders all live and interact with each other on a daily basis. It will also show the creative aspect of humanity taking a close look at people’s relationship with art and music.

Production Stills

screen-shot-2016-11-12-at-23-30-08

Close-up of a child and his father

screen-shot-2016-11-12-at-23-29-02

Long shot of London nightlife outside a restaurant

screen-shot-2016-11-12-at-23-28-13

Long shot of London nightlife

screen-shot-2016-11-12-at-23-41-51

Mid-shot of live music in the streets of London

screen-shot-2016-11-12-at-23-27-59

Mid-shot of humanity within art

 

 

Production Schedule 

Week 1 (24th October 2016 – 30th October 2016):

Monday – Group planning of the film

Tuesday – Book Cameras

Wednesday – Filming (East London)

Thursday – Filming (East London)

Friday – Filming (East London)

Saturday – Filming (East London)

Sunday – Filming (Central London)

Week 2 (31st October 2016 – 6th November 2016):

Monday – Filming (Central London)

Tuesday – Filming and begin editing (Central London)

Wednesday – Filming/ Editing (Central London)

Thursday – Filming/ Editing (West London)

Friday – Filming/ Editing (West London)

Saturday – Filming/ Editing (West London)

Sunday – Filming/ Editing (West London)

Week 3 (7th November 2016 – 13th November 2016):

Monday – Editing 

Tuesday – Editing

Wednesday – Editing

Thursday – Editing

Friday – Editing

Saturday – Editing

Sunday – Editing

Week 4 (14th November 2016 – 20th November 2016):

Monday – Editing 

Tuesday – Screening

Wednesday – Group discussion and finalising post production

Thursday – Final editing

Friday – Submit work

Saturday

Sunday

Bibliography:

Bordwell, D. and Thompson, K. (2001). Film Art: An Introduction 10th ed. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, pp.163-165, 355-369.

Rabiger, M. and Jariod, D. (2007). Directing the Documentary. 6th ed. Barcelona: Omega, pp.22-24, 51-56

Kobre, K. (2012). Videojournalism. 1st ed. Waltham, MA: Focal Press, pp.132-151

 

 

Final Film

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